Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Understanding GMAT data sufficiency question

The next set of blogs will be focusing on Data sufficiency(DS). Many students feel that they make more errors in DS than problem solving. Let us understand this question type in depth.

Sample question:
What is the value of a?

(1)      3a + 2b = 15

(2)      b = (-3/2) (a – 5)


The Directions:

Each data sufficiency problem consists of a question and two statements, labeled (1) and (2), that give data. You have to decide whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the question.

Use the data given in the questions plus your knowledge of mathematics and everyday fact, you must indicate whether the data given in the statements are sufficient for answering the questions and then indicate one of the following answer choices:
(A) Statement (i) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (2) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;
(B) Statement (2) ALONE is sufficient, but statement (1) alone is not sufficient to answer the question asked;
 (C) BOTH statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are sufficient to answer the question asked, but NEITHER statement ALONE is sufficient;
(D) EACH statement ALONE is sufficient to answer the question asked;
(E) Statements (1) and (2) TOGETHER are NOT sufficient to answer the question asked, and additional data are needed.

NOTE: In data sufficiency problems that ask for the value of a quantity, the data given in the statements are sufficient only when it is possible to determine exactly one numerical value for the quantity.
Numbers: All numbers used are real numbers.
Figures: A figure accompanying a data sufficiency problem will conform to the information given in the question but will not necessarily conform to the additional information given in statements (1) and (2).
Lines shown as straight can be assumed to be straight and lines that appear jagged can also be assumed to be straight. You may assume that the positions of points, angles, regions, and so forth exist in the order shown and that angle measures are greater than zero degrees. All figures lie in a plane unless otherwise indicated.

These questions require knowledge of the following topics: • Arithmetic • Elementary algebra • Commonly known concepts of geometry

DS problem – Approach flow chart

Next post: Strategies to tackle data sufficiency questions





3 comments:

  1. Excellent post. I just stumbled upon your blog and wanted to say that I have really enjoyed reading your blog posts. Any way I’ll be subscribing to your feed and I hope you post again soon.

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